If you own a van to sell, why don’t you list it on Exchange and Mart, putting the advert facing thousands of potential customers? Regardless of the main reason, you want a van, while it’s running your own company, or for private usage, there’ll be a Ford van that fits your requirements. It can be quite advantageous to lease a van instead of buy because there are lots of benefits for a business that employs a small or perhaps a huge fleet. The very first time you choose to lease a van it can appear confusing, and that’s why we offer flexible finance to fit your unique circumstances to make buying your new van as simple as possible. On the flip side, if you get a van utilizing hire purchase or dealer finance, it is going to show up on your balance sheet at the start of the agreement. Aside from that, you’ll only have to look after the van so that it stays in a very good condition and is roadworthy and safe that you drive. After that, you’re able to rent a van to continue with your company. check out here you will get fantastic info about van finance.

The advantages of a personal operating lease are found below. One of the benefits of leasing is that you’re thinking of venturing into new grounds with an unknown amount of succeeding and risk of the first lease does not need high start-up expenses or excessive deposits in the automobile. One of the largest benefits of leasing is you can upgrade the van every couple of decades. Perhaps the clearest benefit of van leasing is the flexibility if you arrive at the conclusion of the agreement and don’t require a van any more, you can merely give it back!

The 5-Minute Rule for Van Finance
You obtain an outstanding deal on your finance package, the finance provider earns interest and we’ve got a slim bit of commission, everybody wins! After the contract expires, you just return your vehicle. Leasing The important point to understand is that with the majority of lease deals you’ll never actually have the automobile.

Unfortunately, if you’d like to finish your lease early, you may need to pay off your entire leasing agreement even when you opt to return your vehicle ahead of schedule. If you’re fighting to cover your lease, it may be possible to extend your agreement to cut back the sum you pay monthly. Leasing is a rather low monthly payment. Finance Lease is quite a common product with a number of our clients. Leasing is most likely the smartest choice for sourcing your new business van. A personal operating lease offers an extra credit line. The third sort is finance leasing.

The price is then based on the distance travelled across the whole period of the contract. Irrespective of the method used to buy the automobile, the initial cost or finance costs aren’t tax deductible once you acquire a vehicle personally. Arranging the finance deal you want to cover the price tag, nevertheless, is not. The sum can be for the complete purchase cost of the car you wish to purchase, or it may be employed to make up a shortfall if you intend to pay with cash. A lease purchase is a reasonable solution to purchasing a vehicle as soon as your business doesn’t have the immediate finances to achieve that. Another style of financing your vehicle purchase is by way of a personal loan.

Getting vans finance has never been simpler! It’s possible for you to submit an application for van finance through Zuto using its online application form it’s simple and fast, taking just a few minutes to finish. Therefore, if you’re self-employed and need van finance for your company, or equally if you’re just seeking to fund a van for private usage, we can offer van loans even if you’ve got poor credit. You should also know that lots of forms of van finance will demand a considerable deposit so although you’re spreading the price tag, you’ll still require some sort of lump sum. Van finance is extremely simple to arrange. Every kind of van finance is going to have slightly different tax implications. Finding van finance can be hard whether it is for personal or company usage, and we don’t think that it needs to be.

Our finance can be found on new or used vans, and that means you can discover the ideal LCV which fits within your private budget. You may also opt to pay off any remaining finance in one lump sum, known as a settlement figure. You will be able to locate all you have to know about seeking car finance or an automobile loan and how Zuto can make it as easy as possible. If you’re looking for the most economical and hassle-free vehicle finance in Australia, you’ve come to the correct location.

A British woman has claimed her holiday to Benidorm was ruined because her hotel had ‘too many Spaniards in it’

Freda Jackson, 81, insisted that Spanish people should go somewhere else for their holidays and said she cried at the end of her two-week trip to the popular holiday destination.

The pensioner, who suffers from mobility issues, says her accommodation was teeming with ‘rude’ native Spaniards – who nearly knocked her over on one occasion.

Retired care assistant Freda said: “The hotel was full of Spanish holidaymakers and they really got on our nerves because they were just so rude.

“One evening a Spanish guy nearly knocked me flying and he just walked off without even apologising.

Freda had booked to stay at the Poseidon Playa, located on the outskirts of Benidorm in south east Spain, with a friend in April 2017 (file pic)

“The entertainment in the hotel was all focused and catered for the Spanish – why can’t the Spanish go somewhere else for their holidays?”

Freda had booked to stay at the Poseidon Playa, located on the outskirts of Benidorm in south east Spain, with a friend in April 2017.

The pensioner says the travel operator Thomas Cook had even recommended the hotel and despite her request for flat ground access – it was located on a slope instead.

Grandmother-of-six Freda and her 61-year-old friend paid a total of £1,133 for the holiday and have demanded a full refund or a free trip.

Freda, who lives in Blackburn, Lancashire, said: “I have never complained about a holiday before – but this one was a disaster from start to finish.

The pensioner says the travel operator Thomas Cook had even recommended the hotel and despite her request for flat ground access – it was located on a slope instead (file pic)

“My friend and I paid for it from our pensions and it was a struggle trying to fund it over 12 months and the holiday was totally ruined – I cried after.

“We wanted to go somewhere on flat ground and not in the hills because we have mobility issues.

“To top it off once we got to reception they told us we had been put on the 14th floor, thankfully we were moved to the second floor, and that it was 42 steps down to the hotel’s swimming pool.”

The pair travelled 1,500 miles from Manchester Airport to Alicante on May 10, after not being notified by Thomas Cook that the dates of their flights had changed.

Freda, who has previously visited Greece, Turkey, Portugal and Tenerife, claims Thomas Cook ‘mis-sold’ and ‘ruined’ her dream holiday.

Grandmother-of-six Freda and her 61-year-old friend paid a total of £1,133 for the holiday and have demanded a full refund or a free trip (file pic)

She said there were no reps on the holiday who they could complain to about the trip – so instead Ms Jackson submitted a letter of complaint to Thomas Cook.

Thomas Cook bosses initially offered Freda and her friend a £75 holiday voucher as compensation for the ‘disappointing’ trip abroad.

But after declining the initial ‘goodwill gesture’ made by the travel company, they made an improved offer of £566 to be split between Freda and her friend.

Freda says she is yet to respond to the travel company about their renewed offer.

A Thomas Cook spokesman said: “We are very sorry for the inconvenience this caused and are investigating to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

“We have offered Ms Jackson and her travel companion a gesture of goodwill to try and put things right which we hope she will accept.”

CLOSE

President Trump threatened to have the US Military close the Southern Border. Veuer’s Sam Berman has the full story. Buzz60

caravan of Hondurans trying to reach the U.S. to apply for asylum, he vowed to use the U.S. military to “CLOSE THE SOUTHERN BORDER!”

It’s unclear whether Trump is seriously considering a complete closure of the 2,000-mile border with Mexico, or if he’s using the threat simply to get America’s southern neighbors to cooperate, or that he’s just trying to rally his political base less than three weeks before the midterm elections.

But if sealing the border is realistically on the table, then that raises countless questions over the authority of the president to do so, the logistics of such an endeavor, and the widespread consequences it would have on Americans’ ability to trade, travel and even eat.

“A shutdown of the border, even for a temporary period of time, would have dramatic and devastating economic consequences,” said Peter Boogaard, a former Homeland Security official in the Obama administration now working for FWD.us, an immigration advocacy group.

….In addition to stopping all payments to these countries, which seem to have almost no control over their population, I must, in the strongest of terms, ask Mexico to stop this onslaught – and if unable to do so I will call up the U.S. Military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!..

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 18, 2018

The first question, whether Trump can close the border, is a simple one to answer: yes.

“You can certainly stop entries coming across the border, whether its truck traffic or cars or pedestrians,” said Gil Kerlikowske, former commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. “Logistically, that’s possible. The gates are closed, and you say, ‘Right now we’re not taking entry.'”  

Previous examples are rare. President George W. Bush partially closed the southern border following the 9-11 terrorist attacks, requiring full inspections of every incoming pedestrian and vehicle that led to days-long waits. President Ronald Reagan temporarily closed ports of entry along the southern border in 1985 following the kidnapping and murder of a DEA agent in Mexico.

“(Reagan) wanted answers from Mexico and wasn’t getting them, so he shut the border down,” Thomas Homan, Trump’s former head of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, told Fox News on Thursday. “It wasn’t long before Mexico, unfortunately, found him, he’d been tortured and murdered, but they also arrested the people who committed that crime. It worked.”

The situation gets more complicated if Trump is contemplating using active-duty members of the military to help seal off the massive sections between those ports of entry, a 2,000-mile stretch from Brownsville, Texas, to San Diego, Calif.

The National Guard can definitely be deployed inside the U.S. Several presidents have done so, mobilizing those to assist along the southern border, respond to natural disasters, and help in the war on drugs. Trump has already done the same, issuing an order in April that sent 2,100 National Guard troops to help stop what Trump describes as a “crisis” level of illegal immigration.

But it’s less clear if a president can order active-duty members of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines to patrol the southern border.

TOPSHOT - Honduran migrants attempt to cross the border Goascoran River to enter illegally to El Salvador, in Goascoran, Honduras on October 18, 2018. - US President Donald Trump threatened Thursday to send the military to close its southern border if Mexico fails to stem the "onslaught" of migrants from Central America, in a series of tweets that blamed Democrats ahead of the midterm elections. (Photo by MARVIN RECINOS / AFP)MARVIN RECINOS/AFP/Getty Images ORG XMIT: 207 ORIG FILE ID: AFP_1A477L

Honduran migrants attempt to cross the border Goascoran River to enter illegally to El Salvador, in Goascoran, Honduras on Oct. 18, 2018.  President Donald Trump threatened to send the military to close its southern border if Mexico fails to stem the “onslaught” of migrants from Central America, in a series of tweets that blamed Democrats ahead of the midterm elections. MARVIN RECINOS, AFP/Getty Images

epa07104768 Rafters help Honduran migrants to cross the Suchiate River that divides Guatemala and Mexico in Escuintla, Guatemala, on 19 October 2018, from where they will continue their journey to USA.  EPA-EFE/ESTEBAN BIBA ORG XMIT: GU502

Rafters help Honduran migrants cross the Suchiate River that divides Guatemala and Mexico in Escuintla, Guatemala, Oct. 19,  2018. From where they will continue their journey to USA.  ESTEBAN BIBA, EPA-EFE

epa07104770 Rafters help Honduran migrants to cross the Suchiate River that divides Guatemala and Mexico in Escuintla, Guatemala, on 19 October 2018, from where they will continue their journey to USA.  EPA-EFE/ESTEBAN BIBA ORG XMIT: GU502

Rafters help Honduran migrants cross the Suchiate River that divides Guatemala and Mexico in Escuintla, Guatemala, Oct. 19,  2018. From where they will continue their journey to USA.  ESTEBAN BIBA, EPA-EFE

epa07104769 Honduran migrants rest in the Tecun Uman's park in Escuintla, Guatemala, 19 October 2018, before continue their way to Mexico. Migrants, who hope to arrive to the United States to seek better living conditions, slept in an open-air theater and in the Catholic church of Tecun Uman, a few kilometers from the Suchiate River, which divides Guatemala and Mexico, where a group of migrants has already started a new stage of the crossing.  EPA-EFE/ESTEBAN BIBA ORG XMIT: GU502

Honduran migrants rest in the Tecun Uman’s park in Escuintla, Guatemala,  Oct. 19, 2018, before continue their way to Mexico.  ESTEBAN BIBA, EPA-EFE

epa07104767 Honduran migrants rest in the Tecun Uman's park in Escuintla, Guatemala, 19 October 2018, before continue their way to Mexico. Migrants, who hope to arrive to the United States to seek better living conditions, slept in an open-air theater and in the Catholic church of Tecun Uman, a few kilometers from the Suchiate River, which divides Guatemala and Mexico, where a group of migrants has already started a new stage of the crossing.  EPA-EFE/ESTEBAN BIBA ORG XMIT: GU502

Honduran migrants rest in the Tecun Uman’s park in Escuintla, Guatemala,  Oct. 19, 2018, before continue their way to Mexico.  ESTEBAN BIBA, EPA-EFE

A woman, part of the group of Honduran migrants on the border of Honduras with El Salvador crosses the Goascoran River despite the increased flow caused by intense rains in the last hours, in El Amatillo, eastern Honduras, Oct. 18, 2018.

A woman, part of the group of Honduran migrants on the border of Honduras with El Salvador crosses the Goascoran River despite the increased flow caused by intense rains in the last hours, in El Amatillo, eastern Honduras, Oct. 18, 2018. Rodrigo Sura, EPA-EFE

A group of Honduran migrants on the border of Honduras with El Salvador continue their journey to the US at El Amatillo, eastern Honduras, Oct. 18, 2018.

A group of Honduran migrants on the border of Honduras with El Salvador continue their journey to the US at El Amatillo, eastern Honduras, Oct. 18, 2018. Rodrigo Sura, EPA-EFE

Honduran migrants continue their march to the department of Escuintla to approach the border with Mexico leaving the Casa del Migrante shelter in Guatemala City, Guatemala, Oct. 18, 2018.

Honduran migrants continue their march to the department of Escuintla to approach the border with Mexico leaving the Casa del Migrante shelter in Guatemala City, Guatemala, Oct. 18, 2018. Esteban Biba, EPA-EFE

Migrants run to board a bus as part of a caravan of immigrants en route to the Mexican border in Guatemala City, Guatemala. Oct. 18, 2018.

Migrants run to board a bus as part of a caravan of immigrants en route to the Mexican border in Guatemala City, Guatemala. Oct. 18, 2018. John Moore, Getty Images

Honduran migrants attempt to cross the border Goascoran River to enter illegally to El Salvador, in Goascoran, Honduras Oct. 18, 2018.

Honduran migrants attempt to cross the border Goascoran River to enter illegally to El Salvador, in Goascoran, Honduras Oct. 18, 2018. MARVIN RECINOS, AFP/Getty Images

A Honduran migrant holds up a replica of the Black Christ of Esquipulas as a caravan of migrants making their way to the U.S. arrives to Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. The Guatemalan police blocked the road of the caravan for several hours before allowing the migrants to continue on their way. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC137

A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on Oct. 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  Moises Castillo, AP

ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants pauses at a Guatemalan police checkpoint after crossing the border from Honduras on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219302

The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States.  John Moore, Getty Images

ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219492

A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on Oct. 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  John Moore, Getty Images

A faint Honduran migrant woman is helped as Guatemalan police temporarily block the road after her caravan crossed the Honduras-Guatemala border without incident, in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. Police stopped the migrants for several hours but the travelers refused to return to the border and were eventually allowed to pass. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC136

A faint Honduran migrant woman is helped as Guatemalan police temporarily block the road after her caravan crossed the Honduras-Guatemala border without incident, in Esquipulas, Guatemala.  Moises Castillo, AP

ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  Honduran immigrants overnight at an migrant shelter on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. A caravan of at least 1,500 Central Americans, the second of its kind in 2018, began in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico in route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052270796

Honduran immigrants overnight at an migrant shelter in Esquipulas, Guatemala.  John Moore, Getty Images

ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219378

The caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala.  John Moore, Getty Images

ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants pauses at a Guatemalan police checkpoint after crossing the border from Honduras on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219362

The Honduran migrants pause at a Guatemalan police checkpoint after crossing the border from Honduras.  John Moore, Getty Images

Hondurans march in a caravan of migrants moving toward the country's border with Guatemala in a desperate attempt to flee poverty and seek new lives in the United States, in Ocotepeque, Honduras, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. The group has grown to an estimated 1,600 people from an initial 160 who first gathered early Friday in a northern Honduras city. They plan to try to enter Guatemala on Monday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC106

Hondurans march in a caravan of migrants moving toward the country’s border with Guatemala in a desperate attempt to flee poverty and seek new lives in the United States, in Ocotepeque, Honduras.  Moises Castillo, AP

epa07095951 Guatemalan policemen prevent Honduran migrants from crossing the Agua Caliente border, in Chiquimula, Guatemala, 15 October 2018. The migrant caravan aims to reach the United States fleeing the poverty and insecurity in their country  EPA-EFE/Esteban Biba ORG XMIT: GUA08

Guatemalan policemen prevent Honduran migrants from crossing the Agua Caliente border, in Chiquimula, Guatemala.  Esteban Biba, EPA-EFE

A Honduran migrant holds up a replica of the Black Christ of Esquipulas as Guatemalan police temporarily block the road after the caravan crossed the Honduras-Guatemala border without incident, in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. The caravan began as about 160 people who first gathered early Friday to depart from San Pedro Sula, figuring that traveling as a group would make them less vulnerable to robbery, assault and other dangers common on the migratory path through Central America and Mexico. The group has since grown to at least 1,600 people. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC127

A Honduran migrant holds up a replica of the Black Christ of Esquipulas as Guatemalan police temporarily block the road after the caravan crossed the Honduras-Guatemala border without incident, in Esquipulas, Guatemala.  Moises Castillo, AP

ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219350

Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  John Moore, Getty Images

Honduran migrants holds up their national ID cards as Guatemalan police block them and their caravan after the group crossed the Honduras-Guatemala border without incident, in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. Police stopped the migrants for several hours but the travelers refused to return to the border and were eventually allowed to pass.  (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC131

Honduran migrants holds up their national ID cards as Guatemalan police block them and their caravan after the group crossed the Honduras-Guatemala border without incident, in Esquipulas, Guatemala.  Moises Castillo, AP

ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219454

The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States.  John Moore, Getty Images

ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219320

The migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala.  John Moore, Getty Images

Honduran migrants walk past a roadblock of Guatemalan police as they make their way to the U.S., in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. Police stopped the migrants for several hours but the travelers refused to return to the border and were eventually allowed to pass. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC134

Honduran migrants walk past a roadblock of Guatemalan police as they make their way to the U.S., in Esquipulas, Guatemala. Police stopped the migrants for several hours but the travelers refused to return to the border and were eventually allowed to pass. Moises Castillo, AP

Interested in this topic? You may also want to view these photo galleries:

Last SlideNext Slide

The Posse Comitatus Act of 1878 bars active duty military troops from performing domestic law enforcement functions. Legal and military experts have long cited that law as a barrier to domestic deployments of the military.

“The Department of Defense really doesn’t like to use the military in this law enforcement role. It blurs the line,” said Christine Wormuth, a former undersecretary at the Defense Department and now director of the International Security and Defense Policy Center at the Rand Corporation. “The United States public doesn’t want the military to be policemen.”

But the federal government has created some carve-outs that have allowed for domestic deployments. In 1991, Congress passed a law that allows the Pentagon to assist federal and state law enforcement officials during domestic anti-drug operations. That led to a 1997 incident in Texas where a Marine on a drug-surveillance mission shot and killed an 18-year-old who was herding goats on his family’s ranch. U.S. law also allows the military to respond to armed insurrections and the recovery of weapons of mass destruction.

The Trump administration has already been willing to push legal limits to crack down on immigration, as its done to implement its travel ban, punish so-called “sanctuary cities” and end programs that have protected more than 1 million immigrants from deportation. Put that all together and some military experts feel that Trump could find a way to deploy active-duty military to the border in the name of national security. 

“He has to work with Congress, and there’s some bureaucratic, legal procedures he has to work through, but he can,” said Frank Mora, a former deputy assistant secretary for the Western Hemisphere at the Department of Defense in the Obama administration.

Mora made clear, however, that going through that process would be “ridiculous on so many levels.” He said the idea of deploying active-duty military along the border would not only take away from more important missions, but would be a disproportional response to stop “women, children and young men” from attempting to carry out the legal practice of applying for asylum.

“There are two audiences for this: his (political) base, just three weeks before the election, and to intimidate our friends and allies into submitting and doing what the president wants,” said Mora, now the director of the director of the Kimberly Green Latin American and Caribbean Center at Florida International University.

Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Jamie Davis said the National Guard continues its deployment along the southern border, but that the Department of Defense “has not been tasked to provide additional support” as of Thursday afternoon.

Further complicating any closing of the border is the damage it would cause economically, not only in the four border states but throughout the country.

The U.S. State Department estimates that $1.7 billion in goods and services, and hundreds of thousands of people, legally cross the border each day. The U.S. gets nearly half (44 percent) of its fresh fruits and vegetables from Mexico, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 

“There’s a reason ports of entry exist,” said Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, a group that advocates for lower levels of legal and illegal immigration.

That’s why Krikorian, who wants the migrant caravan stopped, says Trump cannot seriously be considering a full closure of the border. Krikorian believes Trump is either bluffing to get Mexico to stop the caravan for him, or simply using the threat to rile up the Republican base before the midterm elections.

“This really does exemplify how Trump articulates what a lot of ordinary people feel when they see,” a caravan of migrants headed toward the U.S., he said. “That’s part of his strength — he gives voices to the reaction that normal people have to news events.”

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2018/10/18/trump-threatens-seal-southern-border-over-migrant-caravan-can-he/1684534002/

Gene J. Puskar / AP

On Tuesday, October 16, President Donald Trump started tweeting.

“The United States has strongly informed the President of Honduras that if the large Caravan of people heading to the U.S. is not stopped and brought back to Honduras, no more money or aid will be given to Honduras, effective immediately!”

“We have today informed the countries of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador that if they allow their citizens, or others, to journey through their borders and up to the United States, with the intention of entering our country illegally, all payments made to them will STOP (END)!”

Vice President Mike Pence also tweeted:

“Spoke to President Hernandez of Honduras about the migrant caravan heading to the U.S. Delivered strong message from @POTUS: no more aid if caravan is not stopped. Told him U.S. will not tolerate this blatant disregard for our border & sovereignty.”

The apparent impetus for this outrage was a segment on Fox News that morning that detailed a migrant caravan thousands of miles away in Honduras. The caravan, which began sometime in mid-October, is made up of refugees fleeing violence in their home country. Over the next few weeks, Trump did his best to turn the caravan into a national emergency. Trump falsely told his supporters that there were “criminals and unknown Middle Easterners” in the caravan, a claim that had no basis in fact and that was meant to imply that terrorists were hiding in the caravan—one falsehood placed on another. Defense Secretary James Mattis ordered more troops to the border. A Fox News host took it upon herself to ask Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen whether there was “any scenario under which if people force their way across the border they could be shot at,” to which Nielsen responded, “We do not have any intention right now to shoot at people.”

Pence told Fox News on Friday, “What the president of Honduras told me is that the caravan was organized by leftist organizations, political activists within Honduras, and he said it was being funded by outside groups, and even from Venezuela … So the American people, I think, see through this—they understand this is not a spontaneous caravan of vulnerable people.”

The Department of Homeland Security’s Twitter account “confirmed” that within the caravan are people who are “gang members or have significant criminal histories,” without offering evidence of any such ties. Trump sought to blame the opposition party for the caravan’s existence. “Every time you see a Caravan, or people illegally coming, or attempting to come, into our Country illegally, think of and blame the Democrats for not giving us the votes to change our pathetic Immigration Laws!” Trump tweeted on October 22. “Remember the Midterms! So unfair to those who come in legally.”

In the right-wing fever swamps, where the president’s every word is worshipped, commenters began amplifying Trump’s exhortations with new details. Representative Matt Gaetz of Florida wondered whether George Soros—the wealthy Jewish philanthropist whom Trump and several members of the U.S. Senate blamed for the protests against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, and who was recently targeted with a bomb—was behind the migrant caravan. NRATV, the propaganda organ of the National Rifle Association, linked two Republican obsessions, voter fraud and immigration. Chuck Holton told NRATV’s viewers that Soros was sending the caravan to the United States so the migrants could vote: “It’s telling that a bevy of left-wing groups are partnering with a Hungarian-born billionaire and the Venezuelan government to try to influence the 2018 midterms by sending Honduran migrants north in the thousands.” On CNN, the conservative commentator Matt Schlapp pointedly asked the anchor Alisyn Camerota, “Who’s paying for the caravan? Alisyn, who’s paying for the caravan?,” before later answering his own question: “Because of the liberal judges and other people that intercede, including George Soros, we have too much chaos at our southern border.” On Laura Ingraham’s Fox News show, one guest said, “These individuals are not immigrants—these are people that are invading our country,” as another guest asserted that they were seeking “the destruction of American society and culture.”

In the meantime, much of the mainstream press abetted Trump’s effort to make the midterm election a referendum on the caravan. Popular news podcasts devoted entire episodes to the caravan. It remained on the front pages of major media websites. It was an overwhelming topic of conversation on cable news, where Trumpists freely spread disinformation about the threat the migrants posed, while news anchors displayed exasperation over their false claims, only to invite them back on the next day’s newscast to do it all over again.

In reality, the caravan was thousands of miles and weeks away from the U.S. border, shrinking in size, and unlikely to reach the U.S. before the election. If the migrants reach the U.S., they have the right under U.S. law to apply for asylum at a port of entry. If their claims are not accepted, they will be turned away. There is no national emergency; there is no ominous threat. There is only a group of desperate people looking for a better life, who have a right to request asylum in the United States and have no right to stay if their claims are rejected. Trump is reportedly aware that his statements about the caravan are not true. An administration official simply, “It doesn’t matter if it’s 100 percent accurate … This is the play.” The “play” was to demonize vulnerable people with falsehoods in order to frighten Trump’s base to the polls.

Nevertheless, some took the claims of the president and his allies seriously. On Saturday morning, Shabbat, a gunman walked into the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh and killed 11 people. The massacre capped off a week of terrorism, in which one man mailed bombs to nearly a dozen Trump critics and another killed two black people in a grocery store after failing to force his way into a black church.  

Before committing the Tree of Life massacre, the shooter, who blamed Jews for the caravan of “invaders” and who raged about it on social media, made it clear that he was furious at HIAS, founded as the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, a Jewish group that helps resettle refugees in the United States. He shared posts on Gab, a social-media site popular with the alt-right, expressing alarm at the sight of “massive human caravans of young men from Honduras and El Salvador invading America thru our unsecured southern border.” And then he wrote, “HIAS likes to bring invaders in that kill our people. I can’t sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. Screw your optics, I’m going in.”

The people killed on Saturday were killed for trying to make the world a better place, as their faith exhorts them to do. The history of the Jewish people is one of displacement, statelessness, and persecution. What groups like HIAS do in helping refugees, they do with the knowledge that comes from a history of being the targets of demagogues who persecute minorities in pursuit of power.

Ordinarily, a politician cannot be held responsible for the actions of a deranged follower. But ordinarily, politicians don’t praise supporters who have mercilessly beaten a Latino man as “very passionate.” Ordinarily, they don’t offer to pay supporters’ legal bills if they assault protesters on the other side. They don’t praise acts of violence against the media. They don’t defend neo-Nazi rioters as “fine people.” They don’t justify sending bombs to their critics by blaming the media for airing criticism. Ordinarily, there is no historic surge in anti-Semitism, much of it targeted at Jewish critics, coinciding with a politician’s rise. And ordinarily, presidents do not blatantly exploit their authority in an effort to terrify white Americans into voting for their party. For the past few decades, most American politicians, Republican and Democrat alike, have been careful not to urge their supporters to take matters into their own hands. Trump did everything he could to fan the flames, and nothing to restrain those who might take him at his word.

Many of Trump’s defenders argue that his rhetoric is mere shtick—that his attacks, however cruel, aren’t taken 100 percent seriously by his supporters. But to make this argument is to concede that following Trump’s statements to their logical conclusion could lead to violence against his targets, and it is only because most do not take it that way that the political violence committed on Trump’s behalf is as limited as it currently is.

The Tree of Life shooter criticized Trump for not being racist or anti-Semitic enough. But with respect to the caravan, the shooter merely followed the logic of the president and his allies: He was willing to do whatever was necessary to prevent an “invasion” of Latinos planned by perfidious Jews, a treasonous attempt to seek “the destruction of American society and culture.”

The apparent spark for the worst anti-Semitic massacre in American history was a racist hoax inflamed by a U.S. president seeking to help his party win a midterm election. There is no political gesture, no public statement, and no alteration in rhetoric or behavior that will change this fact. The shooter might have found a different reason to act on a different day. But he chose to act on Saturday, and he apparently chose to act in response to a political fiction that the president himself chose to spread and that his followers chose to amplify.

As for those who aided the president in his propaganda campaign, who enabled him to prey on racist fears to fabricate a national emergency, who said to themselves, “This is the play”? Every single one of them bears some responsibility for what followed. Their condemnations of anti-Semitism are meaningless. Their thoughts and prayers are worthless. Their condolences are irrelevant. They can never undo what they have done, and what they have done will never be forgotten.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.

War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Democracy is disenfranchisement.
Photo: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images

In 2002, Mitch McConnell stood up on the Senate floor and delivered an impassioned oration on the moral necessity of disenfranchising former felons. He began his remarks with a four-word sentence that summarized the GOP’s attitude toward democracy more eloquently than the party’s enemies ever could: “Voting is a privilege.”

Seventeen years later, McConnell is still a stalwart champion of shrinking the electorate. But the Senate Majority Leader has grown less forthright with age. Now, instead of defending efforts to restrict the franchise on the grounds that voting is not a right (but rather, a perquisite, which elites like him can extend or withdraw as they see fit), McConnell has decided to go galaxy brain: On Wednesday, the Kentucky senator condemned the Democratic Party’s plan to make Election Day a federal holiday — on the grounds that this proposal constituted an anti-democratic scheme to rewrite election rules in one party’s favor.

“Just what America needs, another paid holiday and a bunch of government workers being paid to go out and work … [on Democratic] campaigns,” McConnell said on the Senate floor. “This is the Democrat plan to restore democracy? … A power grab.”

Making Election Day a holiday is just one piece of HR 1, the hefty package of pro-democracy, anti-corruption reforms that Nancy Pelosi’s caucus passed immediately after taking power. In a op-ed earlier this month, McConnell savaged that legislation’s other provisions — including restrictions on nonprofits’ political spending, and increases in public financing for elections to combat the power of big-dollar private donors — as the Democratic Party’s shameless attempts to protect its own political power.

Some have (understandably) characterized McConnell’s objections as open confessions of the GOP’s belief that it is a minority party: As Vox’s Tara Golshan writes, “He’s saying that making Election Day a federal holiday would result in unfavorable election outcomes for Republicans. More to the point, he’s saying that the more people vote, the worse it is for his party.”

But McConnell is actually making a slightly more sophisticated (though no more persuasive) argument: He’s saying that, while virtually all government workers get to stay home on federal holidays, a very large swath of private-sector workers do not — and since federal workers lean Democratic, Pelosi’s proposal would tilt elections in the left’s direction.

On first glance, this position might look halfway reasonable. But the fatal flaw with McConnell’s stance is that it tacitly affirms the Democrats’ core premise: That who does — and does not — have to work on Election Day unfairly influences electoral outcomes. (Notably, this premise is affirmed by many nonvoters themselves, 35 percent of whom claim they do not vote because their work and/or school commitments leave them with insufficient time to cast a ballot.)

If it is unfair to hold elections on federal holidays, when the disproportionately Democratic constituency of “pointy-headed bureaucrats” is more likely to have free time than the general public, then surely it is unfair to hold elections on any regular weekday, when the disproportionately Republican constituency of retirees will have much more free time than the median American.

Ostensibly, then, Democrats should be able to alleviate McConnell’s concerns by calling for Election Day to be held on a Sunday — or else, by mandating that private-sector employers give all their workers several hours off on the federal Election Day holiday. The Senate Majority Leader would have no reason to oppose to such an idea, unless his objections heretofore have been offered in bad faith.

And what cause has Mitch McConnell ever given us for doubting the sincerity of his putative concerns for procedural fairness, or his commitment to popular democracy?

TAPACHULA, Mexico – Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is sending 800 or more troops to the southern border. That comes after President Trump says he’s “bringing out the military” to address what he’s calling a national emergency at the border as the massive migrant caravan approaches.

Additional troops would provide logistical support to border patrol agents, including vehicles, tents and equipment. There are currently about 2,000 National Guard troops already at the border.

The migrant caravan headed here to the US is starting to weaken as some tired, hungry, and sick travelers are deciding to return home. But roughly 5,000 people are pressing on.

Some are asking questions about who is in the caravan, so CBN News asked our contributing correspondent Chuck Holton to check it out. He caught up with the caravan in the Mexican city of Tapachula.

“I want to try and clarify some of what you’ve been hearing in the news media about this caravan moving north into the United States. First of all, the people in this caravan are not being paid to join the caravan. Their payoff comes when they get to the US,” Holton said.

Holton spoke to numerous people in the caravan who said they joined the trek because they saw advertising for it on social media or heard about it on the news. He says the caravan has been organized by opposition political elements within Honduras who are supported by Venezuela, as well as a consortium of left-wing pro-immigration groups.

“They are however being facilitated and enabled by groups like the UN, by groups like other NGOs and by church groups who are feeding them and providing them support on their journey north,” he said.

Click HERE to get CBN News in your Inbox

“Now the other questions have been: ‘Are there felons, are there bad guys in this group?’ And I can tell you it didn’t take me long to find four or five right away who are absolute felons who are coming north to try to get back into the United States,” Holton discovered.

A Honduran migrant named Freddy was one of several people who told us they’ve been deported from the US four times. “Sure I’ve visited,” he said. “Sometimes two months, sometimes a month. I was imprisoned there in the detention center.”

People are also asking about whether or not there are so-called “exotics” in the caravan – people who are not from Central America. Holton went into a restaurant where he quickly found a young man from Somalia, which is in eastern Africa.

The Somali migrant spoke to CBN News in English, saying he was heading to the US in a few days. “We want to take some rest, you know. We are tired, been on the road,” he said.

The Somali man revealed he began his journey north from Brazil. Holton also spoke with others from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Eritrea and Pakistan who are joining the caravan to the US.

WANT MORE CBN NEWS?
Click Here to Get Our New APP on Your Apple or Android Device

Meanwhile, some people are saying the trip is too difficult and are deciding to head home. “I found two people like that yesterday and actually helped them get back to the border of Guatemala,” Holton said.  

A Honduran migrant named Judy said, “It was really hard, there are lots of people in the group, some good, some bad. While we were all sleeping together someone took my phone. I decided to go back because of my daughter. Carrying her while we walked, I became so tired, and the sun and everything affected us both a lot.”

“My dream has always been to go to the United States because it’s so beautiful, to work and improve the lives of me and my family, and more than anything to give my daughter a better future,” Judy said.

“A lot more people would probably choose to go back home if it wasn’t being made easier to get to the United States by a lot of well-meaning groups who are helping these migrants,” Holton said. “And we can know one thing for sure and that’s that there will be a lot more caravans behind this one because everybody is ready to take advantage of the infrastructure being created by this caravan. And so we have to think hard about how we are going to help these people but also help ourselves.”

MUST SEE – 24-7 News from a Christian Perspective – Right on Your TV:
CLICK HERE to find the CBN News Channel on TV in your area